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· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第十章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第九章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第八章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第七章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第六章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第五章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第四章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第三章
· 傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第二章
傲慢与偏见 (PRIDE AND PREJUDICE)第五章
作者:  点击次数:1918

WITHIN a short walk of Longbourn lived a family with whom the Bennets were particularly intimate. Sir William Lucas had been formerly in trade in Meryton, where he had made a tolerable fortune and risen to the honour of knighthood by an address to the King during his mayoralty. The distinction had perhaps been felt too strongly. It had given him a disgust to his business and to his residence in a small market town; and quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a house about a mile from Meryton, denominated from that period Lucas Lodge, where he could think with pleasure of his own importance, and, unshackled by business, occupy himself solely in being civil to all the world. For though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to every body. By nature inoffensive, friendly and obliging, his presentation at St. James's had made him courteous.
Lady Lucas was a very good kind of woman, not too clever to be a valuable neighbour to Mrs. Bennet. -- They had several children. The eldest of them, a sensible, intelligent young woman, about twenty-seven, was Elizabeth's intimate friend.

That the Miss Lucases and the Miss Bennets should meet to talk over a ball was absolutely necessary; and the morning after the assembly brought the former to Longbourn to hear and to communicate.

"You began the evening well, Charlotte," said Mrs. Bennet with civil self-command to Miss Lucas. "You were Mr. Bingley's first choice."

"Yes; -- but he seemed to like his second better."

"Oh! -- you mean Jane, I suppose -- because he danced with her twice. To be sure that did seem as if he admired her -- indeed I rather believe he did -- I heard something about it -- but I hardly know what -- something about Mr. Robinson."

"Perhaps you mean what I overheard between him and Mr. Robinson; did not I mention it to you? Mr. Robinson's asking him how he liked our Meryton assemblies, and whether he did not think there were a great many pretty women in the room, and which he thought the prettiest? and his answering immediately to the last question -- "Oh! the eldest Miss Bennet beyond a doubt, there cannot be two opinions on that point.""

"Upon my word! -- Well, that was very decided indeed -- that does seem as if -- but, however, it may all come to nothing, you know."

"My overhearings were more to the purpose than yours, Eliza," said Charlotte. "Mr. Darcy is not so well worth listening to as his friend, is he? -- Poor Eliza! -- to be only just tolerable."

"I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his ill-treatment; for he is such a disagreeable man that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him. Mrs. Long told me last night that he sat close to her for half an hour without once opening his lips."

"Are you quite sure, Ma'am? -- is not there a little mistake?" said Jane. -- "I certainly saw Mr. Darcy speaking to her."

"Aye -- because she asked him at last how he liked Netherfield, and he could not help answering her; -- but she said he seemed very angry at being spoke to."

"Miss Bingley told me," said Jane, "that he never speaks much unless among his intimate acquaintance. With them he is remarkably agreeable."

"I do not believe a word of it, my dear. If he had been so very agreeable, he would have talked to Mrs. Long. But I can guess how it was; every body says that he is ate up with pride, and I dare say he had heard somehow that Mrs. Long does not keep a carriage, and had come to the ball in a hack chaise."

"I do not mind his not talking to Mrs. Long," said Miss Lucas, "but I wish he had danced with Eliza."

"Another time, Lizzy," said her mother, "I would not dance with him, if I were you."

"I believe, Ma'am, I may safely promise you never to dance with him."

"His pride," said Miss Lucas, "does not offend me so much as pride often does, because there is an excuse for it. One cannot wonder that so very fine a young man, with family, fortune, every thing in his favour, should think highly of himself. If I may so express it, he has a right to be proud."

"That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine."

"Pride," observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, "is a very common failing I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed, that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonimously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us."

"If I were as rich as Mr. Darcy," cried a young Lucas who came with his sisters, "I should not care how proud I was. I would keep a pack of foxhounds, and drink a bottle of wine every day."

"Then you would drink a great deal more than you ought," said Mrs. Bennet; "and if I were to see you at it, I should take away your bottle directly."

The boy protested that she should not; she continued to declare that she would, and the argument ended only with the visit.

距离浪博恩不远的地方,住着一家人家,这就是威廉·卢卡斯爵士府上。班纳特府上跟他们特别知已。爵士从前是在麦里屯做生意起家发迹的,曾在当市长的任内上书皇上,获得了一个爵士头衔;这个显要的身份使他觉得太荣幸,从此他就讨厌做生意,讨厌住在一个小镇上,于是歇了生意,告别小镇,带着家属迁到那离开麦里屯大约一英里路的一幢房子里去住,从那时候起就把那地方叫做卢家庄。他可以在这儿自得其乐,以显要自居,而且,既然摆脱了生意的纠缠,他大可以一心一意地从事社交活动。他尽管以自己的地位欣然自得,却并不因此而目空一切,反而对什么人都应酬得非常周到。他生来不肯得罪人,待人接物总是和蔼可亲,殷勤体贴,而且自从皇上觐见以来,更加彬彬有礼。卢卡斯太太是个很善良的女人,真是班纳特太太一位宝贵的邻居。卢府上有好几个孩子。大女儿是个明理懂事的年轻小姐,年纪大约二十六七岁,她是伊丽莎白的要好朋友。且说卢府上几位小姐跟班府上几位小姐这回非要见见面,谈谈这次跳舞会上的事业不可。于是在开完了跳舞会的第二天上午,卢府上的小姐们到浪博恩来跟班府上的小姐交换意见。

班纳特太太一看见卢卡斯小姐,便客客气气,从容不迫地说:“那天晚上全靠你开场开得好,你做了彬格莱先生的第一个意中人。”

“是呀;可是他喜欢的倒是第二个意中人。”

“哦,我想你是说吉英吧,因为他跟她跳了两次。看起来,他是真的爱上她呢──我的确相信他是真的──我听到了一些话──可是我弄不清究竟──我听到了一些有关鲁宾逊先生的话。”

“说不定你指的是我喻听到他和鲁宾逊先生的谈话吧;我不是跟你说过了吗?鲁宾逊先生问他喜欢不喜欢我们麦里屯的跳舞会,问他是否觉得到场的女宾们中间有许多人很美,问他认为哪一个最美?他立刻回答了最后一个问题:“毫无问题是班纳特家的大小姐最美。关于这一点,人们决不会有别的看法。”

“一定的!说起来,那的确成了定论啦──看上去的确象是──不过,也许会全部落空呢,你知道。”

“我偷听到的话比你听到的要更有意思了,伊丽莎,”夏绿蒂说。“达西先生的话没有他朋友的话中听,可不是吗?可怜的伊丽莎!他不过认为她还可以!”

“我请求你别叫丽萃想起了他这种无礼的举动又生起气来;他是那么讨厌的一个人,被他看上了才叫倒霉呢。郎格太太告诉我说,昨儿晚上他坐在她身边有半个钟头,可是始终不开口。”

“你的话靠得住吗,妈妈?──一点儿没说错吗?”吉英说。“我清清楚楚看到达西先生跟她说话的。”

“嘿──那是后来她问起他喜欢不喜欢尼日斐花园,他才不得不已敷衍了她一下;可是据她说,他似乎非常生气,好象怪她不该跟她说话似的。”

“彬格莱小姐告诉我,”吉英说,“他从来不爱多说话,除非跟知已的朋友们谈谈。他对待知已朋友非常和蔼可亲。”

“我跟本不相信这种话,要是他果真和蔼可亲,就该跟郎格太太说话啦。可是这里面的奥妙是可想而知的,大家都说他非常骄傲,他所以没跟郎格太太说话,或许是因为听到朗格太太连马车也没有一部,临时雇了车子来参加跳舞会吧。”

“他没跟郎格太太说话,我倒不计较,”卢卡斯小姐说,“我只怪他当时没跟伊丽莎跳舞。”

“丽萃,假如我是你,”她母亲说,“我下次偏不跟他跳舞。”

“妈妈,我相信我可以万无一失地向你保证,我怎么也不跟他跳舞呢。”

“他虽然骄傲,”卢卡斯小姐说,“可不象一般人的骄傲那样使我生气,因为他的骄傲还勉强说得过去。这么优秀的一个青年,门第好,又有钱,样样都比人家强,也难怪他要自以为了不起,照我的说法,他有权利骄傲。”

“这倒是真话,”伊丽莎白回答道,“要是他没有触犯我的骄傲,我也很容易原谅他的骄傲。”

“我以为骄傲是一般人的通病,”曼丽说。她觉得自己的见解很高明,因此提高了谈话的兴致。“从我所读过的许多书看来,我相信那的确是非常普遍的一种通病,人性特别容易趋向于这方面,简直谁都不免因为自己具有了某种品质而自命不凡。虚荣与骄傲是截然不同的两件事,尽管字面上常常当作同义词用,一个人可以骄傲而不虚荣。骄傲多半不外乎我们对我们自己的估价,虚荣却牵涉到我们希望别人对我们的看法。”卢家一个小哥儿(他是跟他姐姐们一起来的)忽然说道:“要是我也像达西先生那么有钱,我真不知道会骄傲到什么地步呢。我要养一群猎狗,还要每天喝一瓶酒。”班纳特太太说:“那你就喝得太过分啦,要量给我看见了,我就马上夺掉你的酒瓶。”那孩子抗议道,她不应该那样做;她接着又宣布了一遍,说她一定要那样,一场辩论直到客人告别时方才结束。


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